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Monday, June 22

  1. page Trends edited ... Shift to Deeper Learning Approaches There is a new emphasis in the classroom on deeper learni…
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    Shift to Deeper Learning Approaches
    There is a new emphasis in the classroom on deeper learning approaches, defined by the Alliance for Excellent Education as the delivery of rich core content to students in innovative ways that allow them to learn and then apply what they have learned. Project-based Learning, Problem-Based Learning, Inquiry-Based Learning, Challenge-Based Learning and similar methods foster more active learning experiences, both inside and outside the classroom. As technologies such as tablets and smartphones are more readily accepted in schools, educators are leveraging these tools, which students already use, to connect the curriculum with real life applications. These active learning approaches are decidedly more student-centered, allowing learners to take control of how they engage with a subject and to brainstorm and implement solutions to pressing local and global problems. The hope is that if learners can connect the course material with their own lives and their surrounding communities, then they will become more excited to learn and immerse themselves in the subject matter.
    ...
    10, 2015
    Significant portions of K12 schooling will undergo improvements through gamification. Multiple devices connecting to multiple learning portals and systems will be more tightly integrated. The curriculum will be part consumed, part created, and very heavy with multimedia. Always on high definition, high quality A/V will be ubiquitous to the learning as student partners and experts collaborate and are facilitated by the school/teacher towards anytime, anywhere, anybody, anything access for learning. (jbillings Jun 1, 2015) Hands-on learning has been a trend and the incorporation of it will continue to be a long-term trend. There are many programs and different educational settings available for students to partake. Specifically, magnet programs or some other form are available in many schools across the country so that students may base their learning through specific interests. For example, many schools in Broward County, Florida offer magnet programs with a specific theme for that school. These themes continue from primary to secondary school. Students have the option to continue their entire K-12 career within the same academic field or they can be admitted to another magnet program if their interests change. krantanen00 Jun 14, 2015 Contextualizing learning to make it more meaningful for the students. Instead of requiring students to learn abstract concepts, we will be contextualizing it with mobile learning and wearable technologies. crompton Jun 14, 2015
    http://wallenberg.stanford.edu/conferences/gmu0609/files/21CLS.pdfhttps://youtu.be/meqbyg_TxT0
    ...
    Hillsboro School District.
    http://www.hsd.k12.or.us/News/tabid/123/Article/304/district-expands-wireless-capacity-at-all-high-schools.aspx jmorrison Jun 3, 2015 [Editor's note: Great article! We'll add this to RQ topic: Wireless Power]
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    1, 2015) [Editor's Note: Added to existing RQ1 topic Learning Analytics]
    Added to RQ4: Challenges
    Standardization Backlash
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  2. page Learning Analytics edited ... add your response here (2) What themes are missing from the above description that you think …
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    add your response here
    (2) What themes are missing from the above description that you think are important?
    add your responseLearning Analytics is becoming embedded in many to most curricular based products. Products/solutions are including formative assessments, some adaptive in ability, and the ability to perform analytics on learning/achievement. Many are delivering dashboards to simplify moving towards data-driven decision making (jbillings Jun 1, 2015) [Editor's Note: Added here from RQ3]
    add your response here
    (3) What do you see as the potential impact of this technology on teaching, learning, and creative inquiry?
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  3. page Wireless Power edited ... add your response here (2) What themes are missing from the above description that you think …
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    add your response here
    (2) What themes are missing from the above description that you think are important?
    add your responseExpansion of Wireless Capacity Hillsboro School District.
    http://www.hsd.k12.or.us/News/tabid/123/Article/304/district-expands-wireless-capacity-at-all-high-schools.aspx jmorrison Jun 3, 2015 [Editor's note: Added
    here from RQ3]
    add your response here
    (3) What do you see as the potential impact of this technology on teaching, learning, or creative inquiry?
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  4. page Online Learning edited ... It is not clear how blended and digital learning fit with the description of online learning p…
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    It is not clear how blended and digital learning fit with the description of online learning presented here. While there will likely be a insurgence of online learning (classes that are strictly online), but sooner, I suspect that we'll see blended (including flipped) learning modalities used in the classroom that will require an increasing amount of bandwidth. anton.inglese Jun 20, 2015
    All indications are that the MOOC fad has ended. I suggest de-emphasizing the role of MOOCs in online learning. The concept is so over-hyped that it may affect the credibility and value of online learning. anton.inglese Jun 20, 2015
    Peer-Based Learning/Informal Learning I know online learning is on the list, but I didn't see anything about informal, peer-based learning that occurs through use of online gaming, online communities, podcasting, vodcasting, etc. I wondering how educators can incorporate this interest driven and user focused type of learning into curriculum. Maybe this falls along with personalized learning. abigail.leighphillips Jun 10, 2015 [Editor's Note: Added here from RQ2]
    (3) What do you see as the potential impact of this technology on teaching, learning, and creative inquiry?
    add your response here
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  5. page Mobile Learning edited ... The proper mobile device is important for use of offline apps. While Chromebooks have saturate…
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    The proper mobile device is important for use of offline apps. While Chromebooks have saturated the education market, they are primarily used with Internet connectivity. This is limiting when in remote areas. In the U.S., the digitial divide still exists, due to socio-economic status, or underserved rural areas.keith.bockwoldt Jun 14, 2015
    There should be some conversation that addresses needs for secure and authentic access to the tools and resources, especially when the conversation focuses on the K-12 community. As more education campuses (both K-12 and higher ed) look to support all types of mobile devices for both academics and research, this means also being prepared to support personal devices owned by students and educators alike - not a small task for IT departments! (kim.owen Jun 17, 2015)
    Context-Aware Ubiquitous Learning Learning with ubiquitous technologies (often using mobile devices) to learn subject content while connecting to the real-world. This can be done with technologies created for a learning situation but it can also be used by teachers using technologies and programs already available crompton Jun 14, 2015 [Editor's Note: Moved here from RQ2]
    (3) What do you see as the potential impact of this technology on teaching, learning, and creative inquiry?
    Mobile learning (and wearable technologies) are THE way to make learning relevant to students. To provide situated, authentic learning mobile devices are the best way to do that. At this time, many educators are just using mobile devices to do things they have always done with traditional learning or tethered technologies. Mobile devices could be used to do many things that could not possibly done with tethered tech. crompton Jun 14, 2015
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  6. page Challenges edited ... http://www.edweek.org/ew/articles/2015/06/11/why-ed-tech-is-not-transforming-how.html "St…
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    http://www.edweek.org/ew/articles/2015/06/11/why-ed-tech-is-not-transforming-how.html "Student centered, hands on, personalized instruction envisioned by ed-tech proponents remains the exception to this rule. There is nothing transformative about every kid having an iPad unless you're able to teach higher-order teaching and learning. Teachers are using technology to enhance what they're doing, but they haven't really given students control over it....use technology to allow them to select and use the right technology, in the right way, with the right students, for the right purpose."jmorrison Jun 10, 2015
    It's so easy to use the words and language of transformation to just keep doing the same old things. At CoSN we talk about the human infrastructure required for a culture shift that supports transformed teaching and learning, and a technological infrastructure that supports the new ways of doing things. Infographic on "Transformation as a Platform for Continual Evolution" here. Interesting article, "no Kid is Average" from Ed Week.
    ...
    17, 2015 Personalized Learning. You have Flipped Classroom, which is part of blended learning, the real strategy. Combine that with the move toward competency-based learning (badging and adaptive software) and you get personalized learning. I think a lot of the things you have on your list are associated with moving toward more Personalized learning environments, but you don't specifically address it in your list. apowell Jun 8, 2015 Agree! And also see personalized learning (doing curriculum at your own pace, until mastered, with rich data and feedback) as essentially making independent, mastery-based learning possible. I think it is one of many tools that enable Authentic Learning - which means more than just preparing kids for SAT's and state tests, but going for deeper learning in richer contexts and also fostering student ownership of their learning. marieb Jun 14, 2015 [Editor's Note: Moved here from RQ2.]
    Rethinking the Roles of Teachers
    Teachers are increasingly expected to be adept at a variety of technology-based and other approaches for content delivery, learner support, and assessment; to collaborate with other teachers both inside and outside their schools; to routinely use digital strategies in their work with students; to act as guides and mentors in to promote student-centered learning; and to organize their own work and comply with administrative documentation and reporting requirements. Students, along with their families, add to these expectations through their own use of technology to socialize, organize, and informally learn on a daily basis. The integration of technology into everyday life is causing many educational thought leaders argue that schools should be providing ways for students to continue to engage in learning activities, formal and informal, beyond the traditional school day. As this trend gathers steam, many schools across the world are rethinking the primary responsibilities of teachers. Related to these evolving expectations are changes in the ways teachers engage in their own continuing professional development, much of which involves social media and online tools and resources. While fully online schools are still relatively rare, an increasing number of teachers are using more hybrid and experiential learning exercises, and experimenting with social media and others ways of building learning communities. As university students enter pre-service education programs surely they will be more tech savvy than those who proceeded them. It is almost like in a span of 15 years technology expert candidates may be the catalyst to change teachers roles.jmorrison May 26, 2015
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  7. page New Topic edited ... Each new topic entry must include a title, a description similar to the ones that are written …
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    Each new topic entry must include a title, a description similar to the ones that are written now, and, if needed, a rationale as to why it is different from any of the existing topics. The Horizon Project research team will investigate each nomination entered here to see if it meets the criteria set for new topics (eg., that the topic represents a "real" technology, as opposed to a concept, a new idea, or a proposal; that it is sufficiently developed that research, projects, and information about it exist; and that it has a demonstrable link, or strong potential link, to education).
    Please "sign" your contributions by marking them with the code of 4 tildes (~) in a row so that we can follow up with you if we need additional information or leads to examples.
    Database Administration.
    As
    Administration
    As
    we move
    ...
    students and orgnizationalorganizational analytics more
    Write a brief description here.
    Video Production and Broadcasting
    To improve interactions and learning experiences, real-time video production and broadcasting will likely become increasingly important. See periscope.tv for as an example. anton.inglese Jun 20, 2015
    Added to RQ1: Important Developments in Educational Technology
    Context-Aware Ubiquitous Learning
    Learning with ubiquitous technologies (often using mobile devices) to learn subject content while connecting to the real-world. This can be done with technologies created for a learning situation but it can also be used by teachers using technologies and programs already available crompton Jun 14, 2015 [Editor's Note: This sounds like a great facet of mobile learning and we'll be adding to RQ1 topic Mobile Learning]
    Peer-Based Learning/Informal Learning
    I know online learning is on the list, but I didn't see anything about informal, peer-based learning that occurs through use of online gaming, online communities, podcasting, vodcasting, etc. I wondering how educators can incorporate this interest driven and user focused type of learning into curriculum. Maybe this falls along with personalized learning. abigail.leighphillips Jun 10, 2015 [Editor's Note: This is such an important and often overlooked dimension of Online Learning. I'm not sure it can stand on its own as a development in technology, so we will add it to RQ1 topic "Online Learning.]
    Added to RQ4: Challenges

    Personalized Learning
    ...
    8, 2015
    Agree!
    Agree! And also
    ...
    14, 2015
    Peer-based Learning/Informal Learning
    I know online learning is on the list, but I didn't see anything about informal, peer-based learning that occurs through use of online gaming, online communities, podcasting, vodcasting, etc. I wondering how educators can incorporate this interest driven and user focused type of learning into curriculum. Maybe this falls along with personalized learning. abigail.leighphillips Jun 10, 2015
    [Editor's Note: This ties in to existing RQ4 Challenge: Personalizing Learning]
    Other Key Points

    Games for Education
    ...
    the gradebook.
    Games
    Games go deeper
    http://e-mergents.com/the-art-of-warcraft-leadership-via-gaming/
    http://educationnext.org/learning-digital-age/
    ...
    Also check out the recent Games for Learning Summit hosted by the Department of Education and Games for Change.
    http://www.gamesforchange.org/2015/04/watch-the-games-for-learning-summit-on-livestream-april-21/
    ...
    14, 2015
    Context-aware ubiquitous learning
    Learning with ubiquitous technologies (often using mobile devices) to learn subject content while connecting
    [Editor's Note: At the beginning of this year, we decided to retire "Games and Gamification" from the real-world. This can be doneNMC Horizon Project. While there are some amazing educators doing exciting things with technologies createdgames, it was a topic that had been repeatedly voted into and stuck in the mid-term horizon for half a learning situation butdecade by expert panels. That was a sign to us that it can also be used by teachers using technologieswas time to retire games and programs already available crompton Jun 14, 2015
    Video production
    gamification until there were new developments and broadcasting
    To improve interactions and learning experiences, real-time video production and broadcasting will likely become increasingly important. See periscope.tv for as an example. anton.inglese Jun 20, 2015
    Add a New Important Development in Technology Here
    Write a brief description here.
    Add a New Important Development in Technology Here
    Write a brief description here.
    Add a New Important Development in Technology Here
    Write a brief description here.
    examples that it would be adopted mainstream.]
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  8. page Challenges edited ... Add your ideas here, with few complete sentences of description including full URLs for refere…
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    Add your ideas here, with few complete sentences of description including full URLs for references (e.g. http://horizon.nmc.org). And do not forget to sign your contribution with 4 ~ (tilde) characters!
    Balancing our Connected and Unconnected Lives
    ...
    2015Mike Abbiatti
    I
    I agree. We
    ...
    May 26, 2015
    Breaking Out of the LMS
    There’s a world of difference between online learning and networked learning. In higher ed, the LMS (learning management system) or CMS (course management system) have not changed in 15 years, while changes outside have pretty much blown the walls off our libraries and classrooms. Most of these systems do little to recognize the collaborative digital world outside the walled gardens. Faculty concerned with managing grades and dropboxes do not seem eager to explore platforms beyond that facilitate natural collaboration, communication and creativity–tools that offer learners the opportunity to customize and organize content and ideas in ways that help them make meaning and authentically participate. joycevalenza Jun 21,
    2015
    Competing Models of Education
    ...
    at scale.
    Two
    Two challenges to
    Creating Authentic Learning Opportunities
    Authentic learning, especially that which brings real life experiences into the classroom, is still all too uncommon in schools. Authentic learning is seen as an important pedagogical strategy, with great potential to increase the engagement of students who are seeking some connection between the world as they know it exists outside of school, and their experiences in school that are meant to prepare them for that world. Use of learning strategies that incorporate real life experiences, technology, and tools that are already familiar to students, and interactions from community members are examples of approaches that can bring authentic learning into the classroom. Practices such as these may help retain students in school and prepare them for further education, careers, and citizenship in a way that traditional practices are too often failing to do.
    Expanding Access
    ...
    of students. Equity. Some students are engaged in schools where they are encouraged to use the tools of their time to learn and create with choice and without significant barriers. Some go to schools dominated by protective/restrictive rather than free-range authentic practices. Some students have libraries rich with curated learning resources, subscription databases, ebooks, audiobooks. Some have no access at all and no preparation at all should they decide to pursue higher ed. joycevalenza Jun 21, 2015
    Improving Digital Literacy
    With the proliferation of the Internet, mobile devices, and other technologies that are now pervasive in education, the traditional view of literacy as the ability to read and write has expanded to encompass understanding digital tools and information. This new category of competence is affecting how education institutions address literacy issues in their curriculum objectives and teacher development programs. Lack of consensus on what comprises digital literacy is impeding many schools from formulating adequate policies and programs that address this challenge. Discussions among educators have included the idea of digital literacy as equating to competence with a wide range of digital tools for varied educational purposes, or as an indicator of having the ability to critically evaluate resources available on the web. However, both definitions are broad and ambiguous. Compounding this issue is the notion that digital literacy encompasses skills that differ for educators and learners, as teaching with technology is inherently different from learning with it. Supporting digital literacy will require policies that both address digital fluency training in pre- and in-service teachers, along with the students they teach.
    ...
    Teacher training still does not acknowledge the fact that digital media literacy continues its rise in importance as a key skill in every discipline and profession. Despite the widespread agreement on the importance of digital competence, training in the supporting skills and techniques is rare in teacher education and non-existent in the preparation of teachers. As teachers begin to realize that they are limiting their students by not helping them to develop and use digital competence skills across the curriculum, the lack of formal training is being offset through professional development or informal learning, but we are far from seeing digital media literacy as a norm. This challenge is exacerbated by the fact that digital literacy is less about tools and more about thinking, and thus skills and standards based on tools and platforms have proven to be somewhat ephemeral. In my humble opinion, digital literacy is very similar to the old teacher ed course in Books and Libraries,affectionately known as " books and berries". For quite awhile, technology has been moving from the home to the school instead of from the school to the home. Our pre-service teachers are more savvy about technologies in their daily lives, but do require the basic understanding of how to use everyday social and productivity tools in the classroom( either online or face-to-face), and the freedom to do so. A major stumbling block is that, in a number of cases, the K-12 systems have more up-to-date technologies than do the higher ed Colleges of Education tasked with preparing new teachers. Yet another reason to have a well designed strategy to respond to the Internet of Things phenomenon in Education as something much broader,deeper ,and significant than a simple Computer Science initiative.mabbiatti May 21, 2015Mike Abbiatti
    Keeping Formal Education Relevant
    ...
    the pile.
    I
    I agree with
    Managing Knowledge Obsolescence
    ...
    to us.
    I
    I feel this
    Personalizing Learning
    ...
    life-long learning.
    Student-centered,
    Student-centered, technology-driven instruction
    http://www.edweek.org/ew/articles/2015/06/11/why-ed-tech-is-not-transforming-how.html "Student centered, hands on, personalized instruction envisioned by ed-tech proponents remains the exception to this rule. There is nothing transformative about every kid having an iPad unless you're able to teach higher-order teaching and learning. Teachers are using technology to enhance what they're doing, but they haven't really given students control over it....use technology to allow them to select and use the right technology, in the right way, with the right students, for the right purpose."jmorrison Jun 10, 2015
    ...
    Evolution" here.
    Interesting
    Interesting article, "no
    http://blogs.edweek.org/edweek/on_innovation/2015/06/nobody_is_average_every_student_deserves_personalized_learning.html?cmp=ENL-EU-NEWS3jmorrison Jun 17, 2015
    Rethinking the Roles of Teachers
    ...
    learning communities.
    As
    As university students
    Scaling Teaching Innovations
    ...
    discourages experimentation.
    I
    I agree with
    ...
    disturbing the classroom.classroom (jbillings Jun
    Safety of Student Data
    Safety of student data has long been a concern in K-12 education, which is evident through legislation that has been passed to safeguard students and their personal data, such as the federal Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act in the United States.106 As schools embrace ubiquitous technology, and more learning takes place online and in 1:1 settings, researchers see great potential to leverage these digital learning environments to mine data, which can be used to decipher trends in student behavior and create personalized software. Schools around the world are adopting cloud computing to support adaptive learning, promote cost-savings, and encourage collaboration, but sometimes the safety of student data is threatened when third-party vendors provide low-cost software as a service in return for access to student data that they then profit from.
    Standardization Backlash
    Teachers and unions are protesting the Common Core. Parents are opting out of standardized testing. Classrooms are focused on "teaching to the test" at the expense of teaching the subjects that the tests should measure. Accountability is a political reality and unintended consequences abound. But now the pendulum is starting to swing the other way. The implication is that the technology infrastructure that was created to support on-line testing and everything that flows from it is ripe to be repurposed for scalable, authentic learning. The focus on interoperability and data collection for reasons of accountability has kicked off the implementation of data systems that can now be used to provide students with the feedback they need to assess and take ownership of their learning. Individual devices with integrated curriculum can also be used as 24/7 collaboration tools. Apple, Google, and (to a limited extent) Microsofts sales and provisioning educational app stores can put control of content and apps in the hands of individual teachers, parents, and students. The obsession with measurement can be used to focus on non-cognitive outcomes such as curiosity, perseverance, disposition, mind-set, agency, collaboration, creativity, etc. Most importantly, the improvements in the distribution infrastructure can continue to evolve explosively, making rapid iteration and experimentation possible for a given student, classroom, or content/app developer. At least to the extent that infrastructure is maturing and more evenly distributed. This creates a need for ever-increasing bandwidth, as student data use becomes driven by students and parents and teachers, with increasingly detailed information in more dimensions that SAT-preparation are collected in real-time by well-designed apps & content, as virtual and immersive environments become more authentic alternatives to deep learning than mere lecture & video, as exploration and creation beyond "teaching to the test" enters a renaissance in an environment where every teacher has the tools to measure and show efficacy in multiple dimensions to parents and students in real time, as on-line geographically distributed co-creation and participative learning become more prevalent, and as the playing field is leveled allowing countless of innovators to provide new apps, content, and unique subject matter to students any time, any place. marieb Jun 14, 2015 [Editor's Note: This reads more like a challenge has therefore been moved to RQ4 Challenges.]

    Teaching Complex Thinking
    It is essential for young people both to understand the networked world in which they are growing up and also — through computational thinking — to understand the difference between human and artificial intelligence, learn how to use abstraction and decomposition when tackling complex tasks, and deploy heuristic reasoning to complex problems. The semantic web, big data, modeling technologies, and other innovations make new approaches to training learners in complex and systems thinking possible. Yet, mastering modes of complex thinking does not make an impact in isolation; communication skills must also be mastered for complex thinking to be applied meaningfully. Indeed, the most effective leaders are outstanding communicators with a high level of social intelligence; their capacity to connect people with other people, using technologies to collaborate and leveraging data to support their ideas, requires an ability to understand the bigger picture and to make appeals that are based on logic, data, and instinct. Computational Thinking ....across all standards (e.g., common core), maths thru language arts. The standards will necessitate integrated content through project-based learning, with projects largely designed, developed, implemented and iterated using always on grid connectivity to anything. Bandwidth has to be very robust. (jbillings Jun 1, 2015) Computational Thinking as applied in STEM. Students will be developing more coding and data analytic skills. Real programming and "bigger" data. These skills in turn will drive interface with sensors and robotics as the Internet of Things and MakerBot become more common place. (jbillings Jun 1, 2015)jmorrison Jun 16, 2015 [Editor's Note: Moved here from RQ3]
    Under-resourced CampusSchool Infrastructure
    Critical
    ...
    management systems.
    Probably
    Probably how technology
    ...
    2015 http://www.speedmatters.org/benefits/archive/k-12-education/
    Infrastructure,
    Infrastructure, Infrastructure, Infrastructure
    ...
    cultural ones.
    To
    To really fulfill
    ...
    tools and platforms.
    The
    platforms.The first steps
    ...
    14, 2015
    Human Infrastructure
    The
    Human Infrastructure. The human challenges
    ...
    is hard.
    Pioneering
    Pioneering districts are
    ...
    herculean investment.
    Even
    Even with a
    ...
    More here.
    That
    That said, the
    ...
    Jun 16, 2015
    Equity
    Some students are engaged in schools where they are encouraged to use the tools of their time to learn and create with choice and without significant barriers. Some go to schools dominated by protective/restrictive rather than free-range authentic practices. Some students have libraries rich with curated learning resources, subscription databases, ebooks, audiobooks. Some have no access at all and no preparation at all should they decide to pursue higher ed. joycevalenza Jun 21, 2015
    Breaking out of the LMS
    There’s a world of difference between online learning and networked learning.
    In higher ed, the LMS (learning management system) or CMS (course management system) have not changed in 15 years, while changes outside have pretty much blown the walls off our libraries and classrooms. Most of these systems do little to recognize the collaborative digital world outside the walled gardens. Faculty concerned with managing grades and dropboxes do not seem eager to explore platforms beyond that facilitate natural collaboration, communication and creativity–tools that offer learners the opportunity to customize and organize content and ideas in ways that help them make meaning and authentically participate. joycevalenza Jun 21,
    2015
    (view changes)
    12:31 pm

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